Snow Partitions


Editions: Original

Size: 38,5×28 cm

Technique: Photo etching with chine-collé

About the piece

This series of etchings, containing two pieces, were created after a trip to Morzine, France. All the images are photographs that Emily Moore took whilst up in the mountains snowboarding; fragments of the surrounding landscape.

About the artist

Emily Moore (b. 1984) lives and works in Edinburgh, Scotland. She graduated with a first class degree from Edinburgh College of Art in 2013. In 2012 she was awarded the Royal Scottish Academy Keith Prize for the best student work and during her final year she was selected for the Saatchi New Sensations Longlist. Following graduation Moore was shortlisted as one of ten finalists for the Griffin Art Prize, appearing in an exhibition at The Griffin Gallery in London, where she was awarded the Griffin Art Prize People’s Choice Award and a sponsored artist award. Since graduating Moore has shown her work internationally as well as regularly exhibiting at the Annual Royal Scottish Academy Open Exhibitions.

Photographs, taken to record her own travels and experiences, are often the starting point for Moore’s landscape based work. Moore is drawn to the patterns and forms found within the natural environment and the contrasting, geometric shapes and lines of the man-made structures which inhabit it. Her work, which encompasses a range of media, explores the tension between these two conflicting themes, attempting to find an overall balance within the final composition. A strong architectural influence is apparent in Moore’s work, which often draws attention to overlooked everyday constructions such as pylons, towers and stairways. The physical act of creating a piece, the surface and materials, has always been an important part of Moore’s practice. She developed her unique style of painting during her final year at Edinburgh College of Art, where she worked directly onto wooden panels, constructing the image in individual detailed layers, whilst retaining elements of the natural wood beneath.